The absolute beauty of digital photography is that you can shoot and shoot and shoot. It might be tempting to delete images that don’t work right away but just hold fire. There is plenty of time for culling in post-production. You don’t need to add another job on the wedding day. Additionally, you have to think that images can be manipulated in the editing, whether that’s cropping or sharpening slightly. Another point is that your mistakes allow you to see where you went wrong and help you to improve.

Thanks so much for this. I’m not a photographer but I understand lighting and just want to know how to set up and get the “look” of shots I see all the time. I’m so grateful for all of this info especially as I’ve just found out I’m having a boy so now I need to find poses that will work as I can no longer do the whole headband and ruffles thing lol! I can’t wait. 🙂
DO be clear about what you're offering. "Make sure the couple knows that you're shooting as a favor and that you can't guarantee results," says New York City-based wedding pro Cappy Hotchkiss. "I've seen many friendships end over this." Limit expectations, and "don't get roped into doing a ton of large family groups. Explain that you will capture groups as they occur," adds the photographer. If it's going to take you months to deliver the photos, let the couple know in advance.
Start your location search by asking your clients of their favorite spots or favorite parks. If they do not have any preferences location-wise, take the liberty of suggesting good locations for them and have some example photos to show the advantage of the places you want to take them. If you do not have many places to showcase, broaden your horizon by doing some research on your own. Check out local parks, open spaces, downtown, museums, cool book stores, coffee shops and more. You can also look at photos of other photographers in your area. If a certain location strikes your fancy, contact the photographer with a compliment to their work and ask about the location where they conducted the photo shoot. If you ask nicely, you will most likely get a response.
Two years, ago, I did one of these sessions for a delightful young couple in Florida at the beach. It was a lot of fun! I was clad in Bermuda shorts, flip-flops, shades, and sunscreen, no less, as I attempted to immerse myself into the celebratory nature of the event. That would my personal advice to beginning photographers doing these sessions. Have fun doing it! Smile, laugh, enjoy yourself, too, and do throw in an occasional compliment on how great your clients look and are doing throughout the session. It would go a long way in making your clients comfortable and pleased with the session. :-)
While the quality can vary from location to location, CVS is perhaps the most consistent. Printing at the chain’s Kodak kiosks is quick for consumers who just can’t wait a few days for an online order. Ordering is also fairly simple, though photo printing kiosks aren’t without glitches. Photo quality won’t match up to professional printers, but CVS appears to have the fewest complaints for inaccurate colors and fuzzy images. Expect to pay 33 cents for one print — you can get better results for a slightly lower price at our picks for the best professional photo labs, below, if you’re willing to wait (and pay to ship). Note: You can also send prints to CVS from your smartphone via the CVS or Snapfish apps.
Once you’ve taken 10-15 shots of the scene, figure out how you can change the setting without disturbing the baby. This picture below is from the same pose as the first photo in this post, but it looks very different. I unclamped the blanket the baby is laying on from the backdrop board, letting it fall behind her. Then I clamped pretty pink fabric to the backdrop board. Finally, I pull the edge of the blanket the baby is lying on up over her back to make it look like she’s tucked in bed. While I was making these changes the baby was snoozing away, staying perfectly posed. I got two very different looking sets of photos from one pose. This is a great way to maximize the baby pictures you get from your DIY photoshoot.

Sounds great right? Well often it’s a bit of pain pairing your phone with your camera. Most apps made by camera manufacturers for smartphones are terrible. Then when you’re actually using the app you’ll find it’s nearly impossible to shoot photos in quick succession (because of the lag between the camera and your phone, and also because it’s tough to repeatedly tap the shutter release button on the app).
After 10 years of full-time photographic adventures and meeting some of the most wonderful people in Texas as well as documenting it for all to see, we’re proud to announce our most-recent expansion! Natalie Roberson Photography has opened a new studio in Celina, which will give customers north of our home base in the Dallas-Fort Worth area a place sit for their family and newborn photography sessions.

Set your camera up to do one of the following: use focus lock, back button focus, or use manual focus. With any of those options the focus will not change from shot to shot. If you use the shutter button to focus and someone moves a little bit so that the focus dot hits the background, you got another “oops”. If you aren’t sure how to do this, consult your camera manual.
Ok, this isn’t a novel idea, but I use this a lot (even still) and think it’s worth the small investment for the random times it’s used.  I have this tripod with a bag carrier, found on Amazon for $14.99. It’s a handy tool for years to come.  Many times I’ve set my tripod up, and RUN into the picture. The toughest part about this method is making sure all the kids look in the right direction, and not at you running back.
If newborns can’t hold their heads up, how do you pose them? A beanbag is an easy tool for helping contour the baby into natural poses. Beanbags designed for the task are easier to work with, but a regular beanbag can work too with a bit more finesse and a bit less cash. Another great posing item for newborns is one that many mums have — a u-shaped nursing pillow.
Our differences are truly our strengths since Nick photographs from a man’s perspective and Natalie from a woman’s point of view.  It’s getting dual artistic coverage of your portrait session from individuals who see life through different lenses!  Because we’ve photographed so many sessions together, we remain calm and happy regardless of the circumstances. We want our clients to be at ease because the best pictures happen when people feel free to be themselves! Every single person is uniquely different from the next so we spend time getting to know each client personally so when we create photos together, they reveal who they truly are.
If you're not sure where you'd like to shoot, don't worry! I'd be glad to offer up some suggestions. If you're looking for a Manhattan or Brooklyn location, I have a great list of New York area spaces that are wonderful for engagement sessions. If you're trying to choose a Philadelphia spot for your engagement pictures, I also have a great list for you! If you are looking to have your portraits done in New Jersey, or anywhere other than New York or Philly, just drop me an email and we can talk. I travel often for engagement sessions, and would love to hear about your plans.
We prefer to focus on the simple beauty of your newborn with minimal use of props and we provide everything for the session. The studio photographs posed newborn sessions between 6-18 days after birth in our studio located in East Dallas location. We only book a set number of newborn sessions each month, so please be sure to secure your due date on our calendar as soon as you know you want to book.  If your baby has already been born we will try my best to squeeze you in so contact me to check scheduling!
Stephanie Krupicka is an award winning photographer who specializes in photographing pregnant women, newborns, infants and children. Stephanie is known for her simple, fresh and natural style of photography and her passion for babies makes her pay attention to the small details to show the beauty of those tiny creatures. Stephanie’s work is based in Lewis/Clark valley and also covers the surrounding areas.
Thank you so much for this article! This past weekend I did my 3rd newborn session which happened to be my grandson. It took 4 hours and I had such difficulty getting him into the poses that I had planned in my head, that when the session was over with I felt totally defeated. I experienced everything you mentioned, including overwhelming myself with too many props. I started doubting myself and wondering if I was even cut out to be a newborn photographer. Your article was very helpful and encouraging at the same time. Thank you so much!
An experience that is aimed to be “stress-free” for you as a parent.  I allow your children to explore, roam and experience the environment around them – both for the purpose of putting ourselves in the best position to get the most out of your time with me, but to also provide you with photographs that capture the natural essence of what makes your children and your family “who you are”
are beautiful and create interest in photos. I absolutely love using multiple textures and layers, especially important when working with a color palette a bit on the neutral or softer side (with a subtle color pop here or there). When I say textures one of the ways to achieve this is with different clothing materials and accents – tweed, crochet and embroidery details, lace, hand knit items, smocking, ribbons, ruffles, etc. Also, having different layers of clothing and accessories can add another dimension to the overall texture of the image. These details and added depth are especially important in black and white images. And it can be done beautifully with colorful brights or just pops of color here and there as well. Follow your own vision and style, also looking to what fits your subjects best.
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