You should also meet them in person. Some important questions to ask in a face-to-face interview may include: how would they describe their wedding photography style? (i.e. photojournalistic, formal, documentary, or creative); will they be the one photographing your wedding or do they have an assistant?; will both people be taking pictures during the day?; do they have back up plan in case of an emergency?; are you comfortable with their emergency plan?; what wedding photography packages do they have?; do they shoot in color or black & white? You should ask if they have a generic schedule for each wedding (portraits before the ceremony or after), and if they are they flexible and open to suggestions. You should even ask to see a contract.
Please, parents… leave the “cheese” at home. Cheese is for crackers. So many times I have found parents who stand behind the photographer and scream, “Say cheese to the lady kids!” Yelling and demanding young children to look at the camera to smile will only stress your children out (not to mention the photographer) and will result in strained, unnatural and often unflattering photographs. Step back, and allow the photographer to naturally interact and talk with your children. This will result in natural, gorgeous smiles. Help the photographer capture the true essence of your child’s personality by talking with and coaxing out those smiles naturally and easily.

Thaddeus Harden Photography is a photography studio based in Southlake, Texas, serving Dallas, Arlington, Irving, Fort Worth, Colleyville, Bedford, Grapevine, Flower Mound Denton, Frisco, Garland, Plano, Carrolton, and Southlake. They have served renowned clients in the City of New York for more than 28 years. Now, Thaddeus Harden brings their talent to Texas as a newborn, maternity, and family photographer. Thaddeus Harden Photography conducts portrait photography services.
Thank you so much for this article! This past weekend I did my 3rd newborn session which happened to be my grandson. It took 4 hours and I had such difficulty getting him into the poses that I had planned in my head, that when the session was over with I felt totally defeated. I experienced everything you mentioned, including overwhelming myself with too many props. I started doubting myself and wondering if I was even cut out to be a newborn photographer. Your article was very helpful and encouraging at the same time. Thank you so much!
As with all photography lighting is key. If you are shooting inside and can’t afford expensive lighting use the most flattering and cheapest form of light there is – sun light! Position your group facing or parallel to a large clean window, if it is a particularly bright day cover it with a thin veil of material, such as a net curtain or peg a white cotton sheet across to act as a diffuser for softer, more flattering light.
Family photography goes beyond mere traditional gestures. The pictures aren’t just decoration for the entrance table, these are your personal links to times and special moments in your life. The essence of this type of photography spans many themes: something to remember when your children were still kids, to commemorate their graduation, or to celebrate a complete gathering. Family pictures are highly meaningful.

(Above Left) Letter Props Engagement Photo Pose Idea: Grab a couple of letter props and carry them as you take a stroll together in your neighbourhood. {Featured here: Love and Baking Flour: Kitchen Engagement Session | Shot by: IZ Photography} | (Above Right)  Indie Engagement Photo Pose Idea: Stop by your fave coffee spot and indulge in your regular orders while capturing the moment for your engagement shoot. {Featured here: Indie Summer Picnic Engagement Shoot Session | Shot by: Jeanne Mitchum Photography}
are beautiful and create interest in photos. I absolutely love using multiple textures and layers, especially important when working with a color palette a bit on the neutral or softer side (with a subtle color pop here or there). When I say textures one of the ways to achieve this is with different clothing materials and accents – tweed, crochet and embroidery details, lace, hand knit items, smocking, ribbons, ruffles, etc. Also, having different layers of clothing and accessories can add another dimension to the overall texture of the image. These details and added depth are especially important in black and white images. And it can be done beautifully with colorful brights or just pops of color here and there as well. Follow your own vision and style, also looking to what fits your subjects best.
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