"He was wonderful working on a last minute family photo for our last Easter in the house we grew up in. Waiting for the pictures, but the couple of sneak peeks I have seen, left me impressed and very excited to see the rest. He blended in well while taking pictures of my family and helped guide us through a process that left our event uninterrupted and stress free."
We used to photograph both larger weddings and elopements, but these days we are 100% elopement photographers. We want to focus on delivering the absolute best expertise in this niche that we can. From beginning to end, we’re deeply involved in the whole planning process, because your elopement is about a lot more than just epic photos. We want you to have an unforgettable experience that leaves you wishing the day would never end! Having photographed many elopements all over the country, we know exactly what goes into crafting and capturing a perfect elopement experience. We love being tour guides, and we love taking pictures, but our favorite part of being an elopement photographer is hands down the fun times we have romping around these epic landscapes with our new friends.
Hey Sherry! Thanks for stopping by & saying hello! I am not familiar with those editing websites (although I did just visit the homepage to check it out)…I CAN say however though, you should forget about the high price of photoshop and get yourself a copy of Adobe Lightroom 5. Lightroom is an amazing program for not only editing but easy storage/file/folder handling of photos and most important it is very easy to use. In fact, I have quite a few tutorials on our YouTube channel. It is “only” $150 or so, and I gotta say, whether someone is a pro or just hobbyist, that $150 will be among the best money you’ll spend on your photos… head over to the adobe site and try it for a free 30 day trial and see for yourself if you’ll like it or not 🙂
Once you’ve taken 10-15 shots of the scene, figure out how you can change the setting without disturbing the baby. This picture below is from the same pose as the first photo in this post, but it looks very different. I unclamped the blanket the baby is laying on from the backdrop board, letting it fall behind her. Then I clamped pretty pink fabric to the backdrop board. Finally, I pull the edge of the blanket the baby is lying on up over her back to make it look like she’s tucked in bed. While I was making these changes the baby was snoozing away, staying perfectly posed. I got two very different looking sets of photos from one pose. This is a great way to maximize the baby pictures you get from your DIY photoshoot.

it’s so important to take a photo of the two of you, with your growing bump.  when you look back on the pictures of the two (well, three including your baby) of you, it will be so fun to see what you both looked like during that time.  even better, take this photo in your nursery so you can remember what your nursery initially looked like.  for us, we didn’t know the gender of our little one so our nursery changed a bit once we found out our baby was a girl when she was born.  it’s fun to see what the beginning stages of her nursery looked like, while we were planning for pink or blue.


Jilly Bean Photography is an award-winning portrait studio located in the heart of historic downtown McKinney, Texas. Jill is an expert in her field, and is known as the "Baby Whisperer of North Texas." She has over a decade of experience as a newborn photographer. At Jilly Bean Photography we pride ourselves on creating beautiful images of your newborn and growing family in a safe, healthy environment.
When I’m photographing kids I make a total idiot of myself. I make funny noises, I sing songs (I’m really bad but they don’t care), I make fish faces, I play peek-a-boo behind the camera.  I run back and forth to the camera with the puppet. I lie on the ground, I stick my butt out. Kids are the ones that have life the right way around, it’s us adults that ruin it. Let them be kids, let them have fun. Then be ready to capture it when it happens.

Ask for referrals and repeat business. If someone is happy with the photographs you took for her, ask her to refer you to her friends. Additionally, try to build repeat business; if you took 6-month portraits for a baby, contact the family 4 or 5 months later and ask whether they would like to book a 1-year portrait session. Your business can snowball through word-of-mouth.[18]
Hopefully this post has helped you answer the question of How do I choose a family photographer. Still want to learn more about choosing a family photographer for your shoot? Here is another great blog about choosing the right photographer which covers some of the same tips as well as additional information on the topic. I love to include other people’s writing on the same topic just because I myself am kind of a research addict for big purchases! Remember, Proper prior planning is everything and research is where it all starts!
Here are some basic concepts that will make your choice easier. Of course, there are many styles that don’t fit into these categories, some of which are difficult to categorize and some photographers do more than one style (I do lifestyle and documentary) or a mix of them. But in general terms most of the family photographers in the market will fit (or semi-fit) into at least one of the following categories:

As a Dallas baby photography we love to give the best birthday experiences! Cake Smash sessions are a great way to celebrate your baby's  milestone! One year cake smash sessions are typically held a month before your child’s first birthday. We offer two cake smash set up options, Classic White set up or Themed Cake set up and we will be provide the cake for both types of sessions. These sessions include anywhere from 15-40 images depending on how well your child responds to the cake smash. Every child reacts differently but it is very rare we can not get good images! We got you covered! Our studio has a bath tub and we keep everything on hand, including towels, wash cloths, baby soap and plastic bags for your dirty clothes!
The night before the shoot I’m usually scouring Google for “family photo tips” or pulling the “How to Pose Children” books off my shelf. Preparation is essential. But photographing a family is a mixture of luck and skill, and when you’re in the thick of it and things aren’t going as planned, you’re going to have to improvise. Kids won’t sit still? Pop on a telephoto lens, back off and let them run around a bit. You might be surprised at the photos you get when you’re forced to do what wasn’t planned.

…and think outside the box. Scarves, hats, flowers in the hair for girls, jewelry, sweaters, vests, jackets, etc. – all these things can take a ho-hum image and make it feel “complete.” Don’t let the accessories overwhelm the subject or the photos though. I believe that especially with sweet babies and toddlers that they don’t need much in the way of “accessories.” Little kiddos are beautiful in their simple purity, and I want them to be the star of the show instead of making one’s eye go straight to a giant headband as big as their head as they sit awkwardly in a big bucket. I want the viewer to notice my subject and their personality first. The accessories and clothing should just complement them – not be center stage. Choose your accent colors and fill in outfits with those punches of color in accessories. For instance, if big sister’s patterned dress has tones of aqua, coral and gray, have mom wear a coral headband and little brother in an aqua pair of Converse and bow tie. Show off the kids’ and your unique personality with accessories!
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